Administration

Administration

Having a Dutch bank account is very useful for daily transactions, such as grocery shopping or paying your rent. Some of the Dutch banks are ING, Rabobank and ABN AMRO.


(Source: EUR International Student Handbook 2018)

It should also be noted that the bank may need your mailing address (home address) as well as a Dutch phone number.

To open a bank account, you can visit the websites of the different banks and first make an appointment at one of their branches.

For more information, visit the websites of the respective banks:

https://www.abnamro.nl/en/personal/payments/open-an-account/index.html

https://www.rabobank.nl/particulieren/studenten/

https://www.ing.nl/particulier/english/new-account/index.html

After receiving your acceptance offer from the Dutch university and confirming your registration, the university will start the application process for your residence permit to the IND (Immigration and Naturalisation Service).

Once you have completed all procedures regarding your residence permit with the university as well as  in the Dutch Embassy in Jakarta, you will eventually receive an email stating that your residence permit can be picked up once you arrive in Rotterdam. The residence permit can be picked up at the IND office in Rotterdam located near Rotterdam Central Station.

Most of the time Indonesian students receive a residence permit/verblijfstitel with type I, which means we do not receive benefits like free public transport for students or educational loans from the Dutch government. For traveling purposes, the residence permit allows you to travel freely through Schengen area countries.

The university monitors your study progress. In case of insufficient results, the IND may be informed. In case you need to extend your stay in the Netherlands to complete your studies, you will have to complete the extension through the university.

More info on:

https://www.eur.nl/en/education/practical-matters/immigration/visa-or-residence-permit

Tuberculosis tests are mandatory for Indonesian citizens as part of the requirement from IND. This can be arranged quite easily when you first arrive by calling GGD Rotterdam on 010 – 433 94 40 on weekdays from 13:15 to 16:45 to make an appointment, or e-mailing them at tbcggd@rotterdam.nl. The GGD is located close to the metro station Leuvehaven. The test itself takes less than five minutes and you will have to do the test every three months.

For further testing, the GGD will usually send a letter to your address containing the date and time of your next appointment. Otherwise, you can always call or email them to get a different appointment time.

More info on:

https://www.ggdrotterdamrijnmond.nl/infectieziekten/tuberculose/

BSN (Burgerservicenummer) is the Dutch citizen number, which you will receive upon registration at the municipality. It can be used for all matters related to the Dutch government, such as signing up for DigID, getting the housing allowance (huurtoeslag) if you are eligible, emergency medical services or matters done at the municipality office.

It is important for you to be registered in the municipality where you live if you are staying in the Netherlands for more than four months.

Having insurance is mandatory by law during your stay in the Netherlands, especially for medical expenses. For students, AON Student Insurance is recommended by Erasmus University Rotterdam. If you have a (part-time) job or an internship which pays you more than €150 per month, you also need to have a basic public health insurance (basiszorgverzekering).

More info on:

https://www.eur.nl/en/education/practical-matters/student-life/insurance

To gain access to healthcare in the Netherlands, it is important to first be registered to a general practitioner, or a huisarts in your neighbourhood. They will be your first point of contact for regular health concerns or to be referred to specialists or hospitals. GP offices may be quite full already, so it is important to register as soon as possible.

You can usually register at a GP by visiting the office and filling in a registration form. Your BSN-number and insurance information may be necessary.

Appointments need to be made before consulting with a GP. This can be done by calling the office or making one directly with the receptionist. Otherwise, the GP may have a spreekuur or an open consultation hour by phone.

In a medical emergency situation, you can first try calling the GP office. Outside regular work hours, you may be referred to a huisartsenpost.